Jordan Peele Hints at Being Open to a “Get Out” Sequel

Ahead of the July 22 release of his new film, Nope, Jordan Peele suggested that he might not bring back the world of directorial debut in a Get Out sequel.

Jordan Peele hinted that he’s still open to making a sequel to his horror classic Get Out, in a recent interview with the Associated Press.


“Never say never,” the filmmaker said when asked about the possibility. “There’s certainly a lot to talk about left. We’ll see.”

Get Out told the story of Chris Washington, a Black man played by Daniel Kaluuya, who goes on a weekend trip to meet the family of his white girlfriend. Washington’s sense of unease is chillingly justified by the reveal that the family has been kidnapping Black people and stealing their bodies to host the minds of aging or sickly family members.


The film deals with the myth of a post-racial America and the continuing commodification of Black bodies. While the wealthy hypnosis cult of Peele’s directorial debut takes a literal approach, wealth in the real world is still generated by trapping people in cycles of poverty.

The ending of the movie leaves potential jumping-off points for a Get Out sequel pretty ambiguous. Washington is rescued from his fate, and the direct antagonists end up dead, but it’s unknown just how long the cult has been successfully transplanting themselves into other bodies.


One thing is certain though, Peele isn’t done making original movies that tackle big societal issues through a twisted reality.


“I feel like I’m off to the races. I just don’t know if I could limit how many films I have that are me,” Peele said. “I’m starting to lose sight of what I would be doing if I wasn’t doing movies like this. So I would say the project has extended.”


His latest, the UFO thriller Nope, is set for release in theaters on July 22 and will see the director reunited with Kaluuya in a starring role yet again.

The first trailer opened with a short clip of the real world’s first-ever moving picture, a two-second clip of a Black jockey riding a horse. But, while the names of the horse and the horse’s owner are known, the jockey’s is lost to history. Nope picks up with a fictional family of Hollywood horse trainers descended from that jockey and is said to comment on the intentions of filmmaking to capture spectacle, and the audience’s insatiable desire to consume it.


Making a movie is basically like chasing the impossible, trying to bottle something that doesn’t exist,” Peele said of the new feature. “I was inspired by films like ‘King Kong’ and ‘Jurassic Park’ that really deal with the human addiction to spectacle and the presentation and monetization of that.”

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